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CSPAN
Oct 27, 2012 8:00am EDT
the new united states. on june 19th of 1812, james madison made a public announcement of the first war ever to be declared in the history of the united states. he said, quote, i exhort all the good people of the united states as they love their country, as they feel wrongs, that they exert themselves. madison's call made clear that the expectation of showing love of country required giving support to the war. at a moment of national crisis patriotism was needed. he sought to justify the conflict to the population at large and motivate the country to support the war. the stakes were high because although a majority in congress had voted in favor of declaring war not one single member of the federalist party had voted in support of the war. northeastern federalists took a very skeptical view of the war, far more so than did southern and western members of the democratic republican party that madison was leading. ostensibly a conflict with britain over national sovereignty, the american war of 1812 very quickly became instead a test or and in addition a test of the strength and meaning of
CSPAN
Oct 18, 2012 11:00pm EDT
refusal to accept the right of a sovereign state, a member of the united nations as a viable state, a state which is legitimate, is unacceptable from any point of view. from any aspect and angle whatsoever. we cannot accept the iranians will be allowed to legitimize another state whatever it is. and certainly not from our point of view not israel. they will have swallow two bitter pills not one. one pill will be the pill of the threat nuclear threat and the other will be the threat of accepting israel right to exist. despite the rhetoric we are hearing from teheran, i believe that many iranians in places of power understand that israel is here to stay. they realize that israel not going disappear as it will not disappear. and therefore, they will have to come terms with this reality. and these two elements means to say in order to achieve the aim, you have to find ways of giving them what did i say a few minutes ago? to resort to the use of dignity. it's a different good thing to do. it's very difficult. i'm not saying it's going to be easy. i think it's something we have to do. becau
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 2:00pm EDT
ambassador, the syrian ambassador of the united states the time called me a pen was also a friend and academic in the past, computer science at damascus university prior to becoming ambassador. he said david, it's on. i'd forgotten about this will mean. i said what is on? he said well, the president was to meet with you. and so i met with him in may and june of that you're extensively. i interviewed his wife in many other syrian officials. >> host: what was the first baby might? >> well, after the pleasantries and after i explained why wanted to do those, my first substantive substantive sentence to him was mr. president, you know i'm not in politics for s-sierra. you know i'm going to read this but can criticize you. he said that's fine. i know you'll criticize me. i know that because i'm not perfect and i know in the past you criticized my father's policy, but you are always fair and objective from their point of view. and then i told him, you know, mr. president, one of the worst things you ever did? with that? said he let it be known that you like phil collins music, the rockstar
CSPAN
Oct 25, 2012 11:00pm EDT
we had. france looks a lot more like the united states, frankly. the western hat name in the last decade is also true you do see it. i haven't done this kind of analysis because as data aren't available to me for other countries. but all the normal indicators of how well those economies are performing say that they've been underperforming in much the same way the united states has been underperforming for the last decade, which it can lends credence to the notion that the this is about is globalization and information technology in the ship and the relative value of intangible assets is tangible assets. >> isn't the real point of difference in the health care you are making quick >> there is a big difference in health care. you're right. [inaudible] >> mind this kind of two-pronged two-pronged -- [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] >> well, on the question of women's earnings, yes, the fact that women are the primary caretakers of children in society as compared to their husbands and a lot of women with children don't have husbands, is certainly a factor. and i felt the biggest fa
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2012 11:00pm EDT
and the new united states. to 19, 1812, james madison made an announcement of the first were to be declared in the history of the united states. "i exhorts all the good people of the united states as they love their country, as they feel wronged that they exert themselves." and made clear the expectation of showing love of country requires giving support to the war. of a moment of national crisis, patriotism was needed. he fell to justify the conflict to motivate the country to support the war. the stakes were high because although a majority had voted in favor of for not one single member of the federalist party voted to support it. the northeastern federalist took a skeptical view more than seven and western members of the democratic republican party. a conflict with britain over national sovereignty, the american war of 1812 became of test of the strength and meeting of american patriotism. we tend to forget the word 1812 between the revolutionary independence movement and trans formative carnage of the civil war. the war between 12 has a dubious distinction the first to be decl
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 1:00pm EDT
john roberts who is the chief justice of the united states. he was hired to be a law clerk. john roberts then ended up serving in the ronald reagan administration and in the supreme court in 2005 succeed william rehnquist after he died from thyroid cancer. what is the legacy do you believe? >> guest: i see that john roberts as being rehnquist's natural air. >> now, roberts is a worn just partisan. his methodology is more conservative than william rehnquist, and there has never been it court is conservative, according to the academic studies, there has never been a court that is more conservative right now than the roberts court, at least not since 1987 when records are being analyzed and kept. i think that roberts is very much different in some respects. i'm not sure that rehnquist would've voted as roberts did. i'm not sure that he would voted as part of the affordable care act. >> i was betting against roberts, too. then what would have happened is that somebody else would have stepped up. i think that roberts is different in some ways. he is much more polished in dealing with
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 9:00am EDT
us to invest in the united states and create jobs. >> we've got some good role models even though this roundtable -- business roundtable doesn't get involved and we don't even great legislators. my expense as a governor is a competitive state, our best teachers on political activist with the labor unions, and then later on george soros. he taught every wealthy individual american you can't afford to sit on the sidelines. and so i say go for it. >> we don't do endorsements either. we have a pack. we're very involved, and last week we launch a retail meets the vote campaign and will probably connect wit with a quar of a million retailers and millions of their employees. not endorsing, not to do that would give them voter guide, encouraging them to be in full. if we're going to address any of the issues, maybe we can get something done everything looks exactly the same. but there's a sense of people of a better understanding of our positions there's a greater likelihood we will get some action on them and that's why we've engaged our membership. >> let's go to questions from the audi
CSPAN
Oct 18, 2012 8:00pm EDT
country and when they come home have great skills that we can put to use here in the united states and a third example the research and development tax credit. i helped shepherd through a credit that brings high-tech high-wage jobs to arizona. when each do that federally. those jobs right here to america. >> moderator: verna and how best to stick during the just arizona and america? parker: the first thing we should do is we should free the current tax rate. if we do that we will put $4000 in the pockets of middle-class americans. the second thing, we must become more competitive on the global scene. we can no longer have the highest corporate income tax in the world. right now we are in the high 30s and if we lower our corporate income tax to 22% we will create 2 million jobs here in america and also if we reinvest and make sure that the research and development tax credits extended by 25% another 2000 jobs. the next point is that i fully support building i 11 from las vegas to phoenix because that will create jobs and i would also advocate that we keep the air force base for that pro
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 8:30pm EDT
the answer to china. i see manufacturing jobs flocking back to the united states given a zero corporate tax rate environment. are you hearing these things from these other two guys? no, not even remotely close. they're arguing over who's going to spend more money on medicare. romney says he wants to balance the federal budget, but that he wants to increase spending for the military. well, it doesn't add up. and if we want to believe in the things that these guys are saying, then i guess we belief in the easter bunny and santa claus and by extension the tooth fairy and, steve, i don't think thai coming. >> host: gary johnson is with us, and want to remind viewers we'll a add a fourth line this morning for third-party voters, 202-585-3883 is your line, and we'll get to your calls in just a couple moments. at this point, um, governor johnson, what's the strategy for the rest of the election? where are you focusing most of your time and attention right now? >> guest: oh, right now there's a lot of attention that's being drawn to what it is that i am saying. i'm being recognized no
CSPAN
Oct 15, 2012 1:00am EDT
for an amount that we decide is due to you. this was the situation. the united states up until that time was seen in iran as a friend of the national movement. iranian nationalism or struggle for them to become masters in their own house to get control of their own destiny started perhaps late in the 19th century or early in the 20th century, and although it united states wasn't a big player in the struggle when we did play we were usually on the right side. there are several famous incidents when the young american teacher by the name of how -- howard was fighting on the side of the constitutionalist and 1910, 1911 president taft sent a treasury team to help the constitutionalists get control of the budget and of the country's finances because the new without that, they were nothing and they had no chance. there was also frustrating. the u.s. was seen as playing a positive role in the azerbaijan crisis in helping iran to restore its sovereignty, territorial integrity. 1953 and what happened with the coup unfortunately changed all of that. one can argue why that happened, how that h
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 11:30pm EDT
in the united states, and they are usually, usually, not always, but usually corrupt and problematic, and they siphon off a lot of money, however, in some countries, there's checks and balances placed on the networks, much more so than others. in a place like syria, these checks and balances were not sufficient to check the networks anywhere in the world to prevent them from running into the ground. >> host: can you give us an example, the network of the u.s., how it exists? >> guest: after the invasion of iraq, one of the major construction or reconstruction quote-on-quote ventures was, you know, commissioned somehow or given somehow to various corporations that are very much in touch or close to or part of the network, for instance, vice president dick cheney, whether it's haliburton, other countries, ended up unfairly taking up the ventures, and, actually, they didn't do a good job at all as a virtue of the results we saw years later. they ended on scandals, and other kinds of such networks. if you'd like to look at a much bigger scale, the entire $700 billion to $800
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 8:45am EDT
want to know about a country look at the map of the united states in terms of the harbors from the east coast of the united states, the 13 colonies jam packed with natural harbors. the coast of africa collectively few good natural harbors but the east coast was packed with them and the continental corporation of the u.s. was the last resource rich part of the ten per zone the european enlightenment with inland waterways flowing in a convenient east west fashion than the west the caressed combined and our ideas and dhaka sees but because of where we happen to live as well that's why these things matter. why these things matter. they've allowed india and china to develop into the completely distinct great worlds of civilization we have much to do with each other through long periods of history. >> let's take that image that you've offered of america, this place with all these great natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave it to the development of what we think of as the united states. it wasn't until the european civi
CSPAN
Oct 25, 2012 9:00am EDT
. most of the major national pollsters do not wait for party identification. in the united states. it's not true in britain but here, here they consider party identification and attitude, not a demographic. they weight for all the standard demographics because the census tells us how many men and women that are in the publishing of how many 18 to 20 euros and those over the age of 55 but by some of the pollsters in the united states are now reading for party invitations they're providing us with two very different pictures of where the election is. those that are waiting for party identification like you, showed no particular pickup for mitt romney after the first debate where as those who did not weight for party identification showed a romney came after the first debate. so very different things going on. as michael just said i would not be surprised if we do not see telephone calls by 2020. a third of households up from 17% in 2084 years ago, cell phones only as michael said, pollsters can't reach those households in the same way. this is a business that has very, very series problem
CSPAN
Oct 3, 2012 5:00pm EDT
believe that given the inherent links between india and the united states in values and political philosophy that the only limit to our cooperation with india should be our independent strategic decisions because any to states can defer. not a bureaucratic obstacles i personally am working daily to remove these obstacles. we are working well beyond purely defense trade with india towards technology sharing and co-production. engagement with our allies and partners is a step to executing our rebalanced as if they help any of us achieve our original security objectives. fifth and last the defense department is turning its formidable innovative power to the asian-pacific region. the counterinsurgency that's of course we've gotten very good doing and which we are going to keep, but as we come out of iraq and afghanistan, defense planners, analysts, scientists and institutions across the country are devoting more and more of their time to thinking about the asia-pacific region. we are developing new operational concepts for the forces. we are integrating operations on land in the air f
CSPAN
Oct 31, 2012 9:00am EDT
about strategic cooperation with the united states, let alone with israel, and more open to iran's message of foreign policy independence. what policy elites here ms., is the islamic republic does not need governments to be more pro-iranian. that's not what they need. they just need these governments to be less pro-american, less pro-israel and more independent. but you often hear in washington in particular that the arab awakening means that iran is going to see. it's only arab allies. or as candidate romney says, evidently without looking at a map, iran's only outlet to the sea. this reflects how it is american elite's, not those sitting in tehran here in denial about basic political trends in the middle east, let alone basic geography. by the islamic republic does not believe that serious bashar al-assad will be overthrown by syrians, the key point is that even a post a sovereign government would not be pro-american or pro-israel. and it may even be less seen on keeping the order with israel quiet. and unless a post assad government were taliban like, serious foreign policy will
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 3:00pm EDT
. booktv visits the united states naval academy. politics, history, and war will be covered. visit booktv.org for a complete schedule of this week's programming and watch as all become weekend long on c-span2 and a booktv.org. up next, dakota meyer talks about the battle in afghanistan and his efforts to rescue soldiers that were ambushed by taliban forces. dakota meyer became the first living marine to receive the medal of honor since the vietnam war. this is about 45 minutes. >> i would like to welcome everybody. this is my official welcome. we are honored to have you here today. we are part of an elite club of authors. there are many that are active here in the american legion post the other thing i want to mention is each of you have a card that looks something like this. several years ago, we began a program called support the troops. the weather was books or dvds or even ipods, batteries, some of the things that they let us know that they needed, and we collected a few boxes and sent them to the troops. each year it has gotten bigger and bigger and bigger. i think last year w
CSPAN
Oct 10, 2012 5:00pm EDT
spokesman for the worlds of finance and business in the united states. the way it is going to work today is seen narrowing to have this conversation for a few minutes and then and we will open and up to you all for your questions. let me just give one are to conflict of interest on the table. the corporate member. the council on foreign relations, one of around 175 corporate members, and i am a shareholder in the company. unfortunately i am a distinct minority shareholder. i wish it were enough to present a conflict of interest, but is not. of greek heritage. so let's -- the last 24 hours the chancellor of germany has been visiting the country of your ancestors, of your four bears. how worried are you about the prospects for greece cack and what it might mean not just for greece and not just for europe, but the globalization and economic linkages for the estates and indirectly your own institutions . so thank you for the introduction. my ancestors, he can blame me for what's going on there. as a side note i remember my grandfather coming home years ago and yelling and screaming abo
CSPAN
Oct 11, 2012 6:00am EDT
, the campaign is for the united states senate. the filibuster has been used in this current united states senate all a long. hasn't been accused? >> i think every party will always see the other party abuses. i like the system. i like the requirement because to get 60 votes. requires working across the aisle. i think that's something i'm well-suited for. so i would not vote to get rid of the filibuster. sometimes it is abused by both parties. >> from 1917-1970, 50 cloture vote. this current senate, 109th cloture vote. what is going on? >> you have a dysfunctional senate. we haven't had a budget passed innocent in more than three years but someone mentioned the other day the last time the senate passed the budget, the apple ipad had not been invented yet. >> how can it be functional is the filibuster is always wearing its had? >> they can. we've had the filibuster for years and with a functional senate. as senator mccain said the other day this is the first time in 51 years that the senate hasn't passed a defense authorization bill. the problem right now, i don't think we will convi
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 8:00pm EDT
the way i grew up. it was a reference to the united states, but, to me, because i grew up in this hometown surrounded by mountains, and i didn't know where the united states was, to me, it was the other side of the mountains, and during that time, my parents were gone working here in the u.s.. i looked at the mountains and think my parents were over there, on the other side of those mountains. that was that to me. >> host: originally, where were you born? >> guest: in mexico, southern mexico in a little city that no one heard of, but when i mention alcapaco, everybody knows that. it was three hours from there. >> host: when did your parents come to the united states? how old were you? >> guest: my father came here in 1997 when i was two years old, and he send for my mother a few years later in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. >> host: when did you come to the united states? >> guest: i came to the united states in 198 # 5. >> host: how old were you? >> guest: in may of 1985, nine and a half going on ten. >> host: what can you tell us about coming to the united states? wh
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 5:30am EDT
the course of doing that, david corn says to the president of the united states, in the oval office is in his house, i am disappointed in this white house and you for not having a fallback plan. literally, again. somebody reading of the president in the oval office for not having a plan. after the meeting, harry reid said to his chief of staff, stood up to him, he needed to hear it. no one was telling him. think about it for a moment. what is the second most powerful democrat in washington have to use his chief of staff as a lever to send a message to the president of the united states? i was talking to somebody from amazon.com the other day. as you may know, they take books and they divide them as red states and blue states. most of the books selling in red states, republican state, blue state, democratic states, and i have said, where does this football? where is it to and he said well, it's purple. because it has information about both sides in all of us. it shows that there is a war going on, not just in the democratic party, but the republican perhaps much more intense. john bo
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 7:00am EDT
promise of the arabs spring and what does this mean for the united states? i certainly think it is important to ask these questions and to seek answers as you are doing today. let me on a personal note start with what happened in benghazi. no one wants to find out exactly what happened more than i do. i have appointed an accountability review board that has already started examining whether our security procedures were appropriate, whether they were properly implemented and what lessons we can and must learn for the future. we are working as thoroughly and expeditiously as possible, knowing that we cannot afford to sacrifice accuracy to speed and of course our government is sparing no effort tracking down the terrorists who perpetrated this attack. and we are focused as we must on what needs to be done to protect our people and our facilities. we had another terrible attack yesterday. i strongly condemn the killing of a long time yemeni employee at our embassy. we are working with yemeni authorities to investigate this and bring those responsible to justice as well but throughout a
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 11:00pm EDT
gets arrested, he spends three years in jail before returning to the united states and deciding to dedicate his entire life to saving north korean. cannot possible read the bock without being moved to tears in just about every single chapter. and the stories are incredible they go in to greater detail on some of these momentarily. melanie kirkpatrick, whom jay will introduce her shortly using the best of the journalist sensibility honed at nearly three decades at the "the wall street journal" to highlight the human side of north korea. we are deeply proud of her and we look forward to her comments today. copies of the escape from north korea are available for purchase at the event for $20 and melanie kirkpatrick will be glad to sign your copy. it's available online at amazon.com. i urge all of you to read it and discuss it and tread again. i ?row the special pleasure of introducing my friend jay. he's a senior partner at kirk land and ellis here in new york city. he's a well known commodity in the washington policy world having served with the distinction in two different administr
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 8:00pm EDT
ultimately the president of the united states and the security means nobody is ever held responsible in any company. he wouldn't know who made the decision not to send troops and anyone working for a government overseas needs to have our full protection and care of government behind them. that is an abject failure, i hear you speaking about it and addressing it. >> guest: mitt romney commented yesterday that this is part of his foreign policy speech that he laid out in virginia. >> host: let's play the clip now. >> they are expressions of a larger struggle that is playing out across the middle east, a region that is now in the midst of the most profound of people in a century. in the fall onto this trouble can be seen clearly in benghazi itself. the attack on our conflict they are on september 11, 2012, was likely the work of forces affiliated with those that attacked our homeland on september 11, 2001. this latest assault can be blamed on the reprehensible video. despite the administration's attempts to convince us of that for so long. the administration has finally conceded that these
CSPAN
Oct 17, 2012 12:00pm EDT
the dilemma from the united states too, this is the dilemma from the united states, you know, iran has exploited situations before. it has exploited situations before. there's the fear that it could exploit this one again, and that is why when we look, we do not know what to make of this group and where it stands on questions of democracy and participation and where it stands in its relationships with iran. we don't -- we have concerns about that. that are hampering our decision making. is there any other question? it's 12:00, we really need to close because of the cameras. so i guess i will say at this point thank you very much for coming. thank you to the panelists. [applause] and, again, we have a web site, www.mepc.org. i hope you visit it. [inaudible conversations] >> the middle east council wrapping up this discussion on foreign policy choices facing the next administration. we are going from this to the heritage foundation live now for a discussion on russia's role in the syrian civil war. this is just getting started. >> minute or two to do a short wrap-up. i will tell you
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 1:15am EDT
wealthy and poverty. the united states over the last decade has witnessed a classic confrontation between the forces of impearlial capitalism and those of established institutions claiming a higherrer have chiewr, expertise and political standing. one side on unforced profit of enterprise, the other on represent and tolls arch privileges at the treasury. the federal reserve and the white house. >> and that is exactly what we have had. you know, when michael lewis wrote that book the big short. he was writing about all the gaggle and hedge end and the best against the big banks who were all supporting these sub prime mortgage concoctions and con fecks and scams. and it was all the most prestige use forces and the u.s. and the world economy that backed this blind side, as i call did, people who were investment in these crazy con contacted mortgage security in which the value was totally unknown by people who really investing in it. and so the people who were shorting these were these hedge fund. and venture fund and private equity fund. automatic these are not seeking special govern
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2012 5:00pm EDT
league of women voters and tom smith tells well. the time i served in the united states senate i've been an independent voice for the people in the state and i've gotten results from the people of the state. in this campaign today, seven newspapers have made an editorial the as to who they would endorse. and all seven endorsed my candidacy. one of the reasons, not the only but one of the reasons that those newspapers endorsed me from the spread to california and a lot of places in between because of my record and the results that i achieved for the people in the state either leading the fight to cut the payroll tax for millions of americans and in pennsylvania so they could of dollars in the pocket to be doubled to invest in the economy, trade adjustment when the workers lose their jobs because of the unfair foreign competition and i let the fight pass that legislation given the training they need to get back on their feet. the so-called dredging plastic the deepening of the channels on was the key player in getting the most recent funding for that so getting results is key for the econo
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 9:00am EDT
blanche for the passport. can you imagine the canadian government coming to the united states congress and asking us for blank passports? domeback. he's dealing with every level from the white house, jimmy carter, who actually approved, tony had one foot out the door in germany and a cable came into his head stop, president is reviewing. 20 minutes later, godspeed, good luck, from the president of the united states. this is unprecedented. because as he said, if this didn't a wealthy american flag was going to be draped all over it. so he's working with the canadians, working wit with a we us, working with the cia bureaucracy, and is working with the state department. and it's difficult to get everybody on the same page with the idea that they are calling the best bad idea they could come up with. he did all that. but beyond that he went and walked them through the airport on his own, which wasn't necessarily in the plan, and our headquarters often tells us don't do that. don't go in the airport with them. if it goes wrong, they will look to you. without even thinking about it they will
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 6:00pm EDT
program from the booktv archives, the expedited expansion to the united states, and facilitated trade to the u.s.. the author recounts the development for initial proposal of construction in the 1800 to the day it opened on october 26th, 1825. this is about 40 minutes. >> i'm going to talk for 30 minutes, # and then we'll have time for a few minutes of q&a afterwards. it was not my idea to write this book. an editor asked the agent if he knew someone who could write a book. my agent said yes. the guy had written the box about new york city's water history, and the editor said great, editor called me, and i said, "why"? what is there new to write about a canal? can one make history out of iconic folklore? one was written in decades for children, an indication that the subject is not fertile ground for adult readers. my agent answered the question "why" by saying when a major publisher wants to pay you money for your second book, you just say yes, and so i did say "yes" after resolving the issue of a contract for a different book, but i began to answer the "why" question myself and ther
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 8:15am EDT
activities. he spends three years in jail before returning to the united states in deciding to dedicate his entire life to saving north koreans. you cannot possibly read this book without being profoundly moved without frankly been moved to tears and just about every single chapter. and the stories are incredible. we will go into greater detail in some of these momentarily. melanie kirkpatrick, i'm jay lefkowitz will introduce shortly uses the best of her journalist sensibilities honed in three decades at "the wall street journal" to highlight the human side of the tragedy of north korea and we are deeply proud and we look forward to her comments today. copies of "escape from north korea" are available for purchase at today's event for $20 melanie curt -- it would be glad to send your copy. it's also available at amazon.com. buy your shallow view another online booksellers to read it, discuss it and read it again. i now have a special pleasure of introducing my friend, jay lefkowitz. shea is a senior partner at kirkland and alice here in new york city. jay is a well-known commodity in the w
CSPAN
Oct 24, 2012 9:00am EDT
the factory. and we are expert in the solar panels to the united states. to u.s. citizens have cleaner air but we do not. that's a really big problem. that's an old model. the old model. the new model would be if they cannot only create the manufacturing solar panel but also creating new innovative types of technology that might be way more efficient than what we have to. but also in staunton and consumed by an adult. that is very, very difficult to do because that requires central government to break past some very powerful state owned on ane interest, including coal country, power generation companies and state creates. the state grid corporation controls china's national utility grid. they can do 80% of the chinese territory. they have been really dragging their heels connecting wind and solar resources to the great. so getting that side of equation right is going to really critical going forward, but very, very difficult to do. and so that raises the question of whether this new leadership is really going to be able to get things done, we don't know the full politburo standing comm
CSPAN
Oct 15, 2012 5:00pm EDT
different, most comparable to iran in terms of views of the united states. so there's a very different dynamic on the ground among libyan youth. notwithstanding what we're seeing in the news. um, and i thought the uprising in benghazi was hugely a success, important to think about when 30,000 people rose up a few weekends ago to throw out islamist militias. the population once again taking control of the situation where a dysfunctional government wasn't able to. and i found the intervention very interesting because in many ways i think the main bogeyman was not the islamist militias, but the fear of what the 30,000 would do if things got much worse. which brings up another thing that i should have said in the introductory remarks, the arab spring, the dynamic, we view it as people against regimes, but just as important is regimes against regimes and people against people, and i'm happy to talk about those in the q&a, but it's not just people against regimes. following benghazi, a well known libyan academic said something which stuck with me. he said libyans have no idea where they're g
CSPAN
Oct 26, 2012 6:00am EDT
here in the united states, china will be transitioning to a new leadership. the new generation of leaders will guide china probably through the next decade. if given a second term to how does president obama see the opportunities in the transition? what measures with the president propose to take the new heads of state relationship? >> well, president obama reached out to hu jintao right after president obama was elected. and right after he took office. he's met with hu jintao more than any previous president had met with a counterpart. they have met something upwards of a dozen times. many phone calls. i'm sure that this pattern will continue with the next chinese leadership. the chinese haven't done us a favor yet of telling us who will be in the new leadership. that will be announced on november 8. i think we're all confident we know that the general secretary of the congress party will be xi jinping. will have a pretty good idea of at least four members of the politburo standing committee, and perhaps other members. i think, the important thing here is that china needs to resu
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 12:00pm EDT
. together these books comprise not haphazardly but purposefully a history of the united states for the last 200 or so years. a number of these books have been best sellers. traitor to his class and the first american were both finalists for the pulitzer prize and you can see h. w. brands on tv all the time if you go to the history channel or turn on the tv, there he is. this book is -- i will hold this up again so you can see and recognize it easily at the book signing tend, it is a tremendous biography of ulysses grant filled with stuffed i certainly never knew and was delighted to find out. it is very authoritatively and readable. before we get to grant himself i wanted to ask bill a broad question about biography. here at the book festival there are a number of biographers. i have read several of these already, robert caro's latest volume in his massive history, biography of lyndon johnson. janet reed's biography leonard cohen, all these people at the book festival among others. david maraniss is here with a book about obama. i was curious because all these books are so different in
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 7:00am EDT
supreme court for corporately no other law schools in the united states. [laughter] besides those two. it is a bizarre and unfortunate fact i think. but those are help interesting facts about the supreme court. but, frankly, i don't think they're very important. here's an important fact about the supreme court. there are five republicans and four democrats. i will speak for somewhat longer, but this is basically all you need to know. [laughter] if there's a take away here, i've gotten to the point early. there are five republicans and four democrats, and that really tells you much of what you need to know. and it is true that the justices wear robes because they're supposed to look all alike, and this was, you know, supposed to give the perception that they're all pretty much the same. but just as on the other side of first street, the united states congress is deeply divided, according to party, so was the united states supreme court. and this is a moment of real partisan division at the supreme court. and that is exemplified in case after case. why this moment is so important i thin
CSPAN
Oct 24, 2012 5:00pm EDT
or united states senators. it is a horrible system. we need to get rid of all of these ridiculous restrictions on contributions and let the american public give as transparently and openly, and let the candidates have the control of the races again instead of all of the outside groups having more influence, spending more money than the candidate's committees themselves. >> one other factor i think should be included in this is the primary system we have today. when john kennedy ran for president, he took part in five primaries. >> right. >> the party leaders tried to seek consensus, a candidate to reach out more broadly. well, from 1920-1972, we had a landslide presidential election every year or every other year that built consensus letting the losing side know they lost. since we we want to an all nominate -- all primary systems, we have only had one landslide. >> i disagree. >> because you didn't hire a pollster. >> he's not going to say anything nice. i was the only one who didn't hire a pollster for the campaign. the reason is because the country's changed fundamentally. when
CSPAN
Oct 22, 2012 5:00pm EDT
united states is going to have to make, i just don't believe the place you go first is those programs, those so-called entitlements, which provide a basic floor of income and a modest amount of medical care for the elderly, the disabled, for people who can't make their way on their own, and in many cases, have given a great deal to this country. the vice president did call social security a few years ago basically or largely a welfare program. it isn't. it's a contract between generations. it's something that we pay into now so that we will have a secure retirement, and our parents and grandparents will have a secure retirement. it's a very sacred contract, and i believe in it. so that's not where we ought to go. there are plenty of places to cut. there's lots we can do in the pentagon where dishonest contractors have been lining their pockets at the expense of the american taxpayer. there are we certainly ought to be able to -- >> governor -- >> give our farm families a decent income with spending $20 to $25 billion a year on farm subsidies, and i'm sure we can do that. that's where
CSPAN
Oct 19, 2012 8:00pm EDT
my life to continue that work is your united states senator. >> moderator: thank you. we hope this debate has subfolders as they ponder their decision and a selection only urge you to vote on election day. what you think our candidates, chris murphy and linda mcmahon and our reporter panel, al terzi, dennis house, keisha grant and mark davis if i could have your attention,e program on manufacturing society in the 21st century here at the institute. i welcome you on behalf of the institute both in the audience and those viewing remotely. i wanted to ask our president, walter isaacson, just to say a few words. it's always dangerous when your boss knows as much or more about the subject matter. >> that is definitely not true and that is why it is a pleasure to have tom here at the aspen institute because the one thing we do know about the issue of manufacturing is how important it is to america's economy and how ridiculous it is to try to think of a great economy that doesn't always have a healthy manufacturing sector. and so, when we were looking at the aspen institute and all the th
CSPAN
Oct 12, 2012 5:00pm EDT
have a system in the united states, a labor intensive system that could employ a large number of dedicated professionals that can support people, support our young people who are not succeeding right now in making that transition from school to work, whether that be from college or high school. third, let's have an energy debate that is the find not by war but by and. there is scope for us to do more with renewals. yes, there is scope for us to do things with fossil fuels that are environmentally better and better in terms of national security because they don't involve dependence on foreign suppliers, of a kind that would have been unimaginable five years ago. and yes, there are still -- there is still substantial scope for increased energy efficiency and energy in efficiency is no less worth pursuing because we have found more natural gas. let's stop debating what the relative priority to attached to these measures are, and let's have our failures in the energy arianna after 50 years of talking, having to do too much rather than tried to do too little. as production comes, incr
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2012 11:00pm EDT
disaster for the united states to do. not a smart thing. you're going to turn him into a martyr, a martyr in the eyes of people all around the world, that doesn't advantage the united states. and i think the u.s. has already made a number of mistakes in this case with overkill and overaggressive accusations against him, which he's used very much to his benefit. i mean, if you looked at the asylum decision that was given by the ecuadoran foreign minister consisted o after long recitation of things that were said by public affairs spokesmen, by department of defense, by american diplomats, american public officials and so on. i was just listening to this, like, stunned at it. so it just seems to me that that would backfire. >> so questions from the audience in the short time we have here. anybody want to ask anything? there's a question back here. >> on the subject of leaks, i think we have to ask "the new york times" how often do you get leaks that are just so egregious from a national security point of view that you just step back from? i'm sure you get a lot of boring stuff that you just
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2012 7:00am EDT
, in the famous or infamous dred scott decision, united states supreme court confirmed the southern constitutional view. republicans in contrast, never, no matter the supreme court. republicans would allow no more slaves in any territory. abraham lincoln was elected in november 1860. a month later, the united states congress came into session. members of congress put forth various compromise proposals, a critical portion of all in some way dealt with the division of the territory. most often their was a proposal to extend some kind of dividing line, westward beyond the louisiana purchase all the way to the border of california. now, after this rather lengthy preface i'm going to get to my main topic of why lincoln rejected on meaningful compromise, which dealt with the territories. but there must be one thing more. i'm going to talk about three different men tonight. one of you, one of them, all of you know, those men, abraham lincoln and we was and what he did. the other two are not so well known. so probably a number of your familiar with henry clay, the great kentucky statesman.
CSPAN
Oct 29, 2012 12:00am EDT
to the united states was now burned as a source because we can't believe him not because he was lobbying the there were concerns that haven't been told about this. there are concerns about listening to many of the soviet diplomats and then being sent back to life that is what they were doing. but they really have to follow through and get out to verify first. they talk about how this might impact the trippi which history has no parallel. so what they have to do is look at how they can do it and what that involves as american eyes seeing what's happening on the ground. the same weapons into cuba, fidel castro is not going to allow that. the next best thing is sending american surveillance planes over. that in itself is a complicated decision because it had been shot down on october 27th. fidel castro was still threatening to shoot down the plant and they were coming back with bullet holes in the aircraft fire. for kennedy this is a decision device and american pilots into harm's way. whether we send these over today. the verification of this program is about sending american plan
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 1:15am EDT
candidacy for the presidency of the united states we have seen york can it is and frankly they scare the shipped out of us. so we were running candidate to be the president. not brian, the canadian government but the people we love our big brother. we are here to help. we did a campaign video in january. it went by role. with media tv it -- to be around the world so we took off with another couple of videos three weeks later we had a deal and this is what we wrote. "america, but better" the canada party manifesto" your continental bff. that is us. the beautiful face of canadair representing 33 million brothers and sisters up to the north that want to see return to the great country used to be and will be in the future. [applause] >> canada up. canada. [laughter] i cannot even get back going in canada. [laughter] someone came north to pick a fight 200 years ago canada apologized for being invaded and we have been fast friends ever since. your strong and popular the country that everyone aspires to be but lately use stopped playing with the team. use started to put on some weight and becam
CSPAN
Oct 12, 2012 8:00pm EDT
distinguished career in public service as a lawyer in arkansas, as the first lady of the united states and more recently as a united states senator from the state of new york. she not only has the highest approval rating of any member of the u.s. cabinet, she has as well topped the gallup poll for 16 years as the most admired woman in the world, besting the previous record of eleanor roosevelt who held the title for only 13 years. as america continues to engage in north africa, we are extremely fortunate to be served by a public servant who is engaged in these challenges day in and day out, who cares deeply about the issues and how they affect americans interest and who believes in an even brighter future for the people of the middle east. please join me in welcoming the secretary of state, the honorable hillary rodham clinton. [applause] >> thank you. [applause] thank you all. thank you very much, and a special word of thanks to a friend and someone whom i admire greatly, general scowcroft. his many years of distinguished service to our country is a great tribute in every aspect -- in eve
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 8:30pm EDT
the united states, it's a minor procedure, but in the rest of the world, there's 1 # -- 100 million people blind because it. dr. v, as he was known, wanted to address. he started the clinic in the home, had 11 beds and family members helped him, got it off the ground. anyway, cut forward not just three great ideas, but hundreds of innovation, tenacity of an entire global team of people involving larry, who is one of the folks who contributed to the eradication of smallpox, a brilliant entrepreneur named david green. they worked together to build this hospital, and to this day, the hospital cured 3 million people of blindness. now, you imagine the entire washington metro area, 3 million people, imagine all of those people blind, and now they can see. that's not -- that's not an obscure story; right? it's not an obscure story in the worlds of people where i circulate. people know about the hospital and respect it. people traveled from all over the world to go to the hospital to train to bring the same programs to their countries. it's a movement to end needless blindness. it's just on
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 11:00pm EDT
a different america. they are grow up in fundamentally -- that the united states provide. we are per expect we can't see perfect. we have brought enormous amount of public goods. your kids will grow up in a different world. and so that's what i've been to cussed on on than what are the source of our strength and how we new them. you can't renew those sources of strength without some kind of political comprise. now i would argue that we're actually two decisions two big decisions away from a melted up in the american economy. if we get a decision on the grand bargain, the kind of ten year time frame we would manage the cut and spending and tax increases and in investments, we need do all three. we need to tax, cut, and invest in the source of our strength. i think that would have a huge effect. i think americans today feel in many ways like children of two divorced parents. i think it's a pal in the country in a lot of ways. it would be huge. if we got a grand bargain on energy how to exploit the boundary of -- i think the two together would have a huge impact. so the question is how
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 7:00pm EDT
day later the ambassador to the united states called me up and was also a friend and also an academic. dean of computer science at damascus university prior to becoming ambassador. he said, it's on. and i had forgotten about this whole thing. and i said, what's on? and the set to well, the president wants to meet with you and so common with him in may and june of that year extensively, it's viewed his wife and many other syrian officials. >> what was the first meeting like? >> well, after the pleasantries in after i explained why i wanted to do this my first substantive sentence to him was, mr. president, you know i'm not an apologist for syria. of writing this book on you, and of going to criticize you. and he said, that's fine. i know you will criticize me. i know that because i'm not perfect and in the past you criticize my father's policy, but you're always fair and objective. then i told him, one of the worst things you never did. >> what's that? >> you let it be known the like phil collins music, the rock star from england. he had a puzzled look does face a loss for rethinking w
CSPAN
Oct 18, 2012 6:00am EDT
banks do. nobody else in the united states or in the uk is equally committed to making it medium sized. eat before the crisis or during the crisis. the importance to protect people with their money and give them a safe place to put it. those are all public functions. they're all protected every place. when push comes to shove, they get double. you shouldn't do that when people are just engaged in trading for their own account. without any public responsibilities as i see it. that's the heart of the matter. >> i'm very pleased you would come in at this time. i think we suffer from a major confusion that you can help us sort out. in the u.s. they're returning following the advice. and we have in the independent banking commission a halfway house. and it should go the whole way. this is a completely wrong characterization that i think of what you're saying, you're saying they can't a wide rapg of functions that can be alongside the payment system. then there are another type of transactions that shouldn't be there at all. they should go off right to a separate institution. and in te
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 5:45am EDT
the united states in safety. she tells the story through the eyes of the workers on the underground railroad largely people involved in christian relief organizations both here in the united states and in northeastern china who work and at great risk to their own lives trying to open up a channel for north creern refugees to escape. north korea, as you know, is probably the most repressive regime in the world at this stage. it is a place where millions of north korea citizens have literally been starved by an intelligencal government policy over the last ten to fifteen years. it's a place that houses and has housed for well over a decade of serious of -- concentration camps where political prisoners are tortured, sometimes executed for crimes no more serious than listening to a foreign radio broadcast. , reading a bible or disrespecting a picture of the dear leader. it's really a chilling book and it's a book that should be must read for anyone who cares about human rights or who cares about the political environment and the foreign policy concerns that relate to north korea. as a g
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